Urge Incontinence Treatment in Columbus, OH

What Is Overactive Bladder (OAB)?

Overactive bladder is a problem with bladder-storage function that causes a sudden urge to urinate. The urge may be difficult to stop, and overactive bladder may lead to the involuntary loss of urine (incontinence).

If you have an overactive bladder, you may feel embarrassed, isolate yourself, or limit your work and social life. The good news is that a brief evaluation can determine whether there’s a cause for your overactive bladder symptoms. Available treatments may greatly reduce or eliminate the symptoms and help you manage their effect on your daily life.

Click here for more information on overactive bladder syndrome

Overactive Bladder & Urge Incontinence Symptoms

Some people find that they may need to urinate more frequently due to factors such as drinking too much water or consuming a diuretic like coffee. These issues may temporarily lead to more frequent urination, but a person who has true symptoms of urge incontinence will feel the following signs on a consistent basis:

  • A Sudden Urge to Urinate. A person with urge incontinence will often find themselves feeling the sudden and overwhelming need to urinate at random times during the day. The urge is sudden and will occur regardless of how much and how recently the person has had a drink. 
  • Frequent Urination. In a person with normal bladder function, urination occurs no more than eight times in a 24 hour period. A person who has an urge incontinence will need to visit the restroom more times than that and in some cases, may only release a small amount of urine at a time. 
  • Disrupted Sleep. It is normal to occasionally awaken during the night to urinate, but in people with urge incontinence, the issue is more consistent. Sufferers often wake up during the night one to two times to urinate on an almost nightly basis. 

Urge Incontinence Causes

To understand what can cause an urge incontinence, it’s important to know how the the urinary system works:

  1. The kidneys produce urine which then drains into the bladder.
  2. When the bladder fills, nerve signals are transmitted to the brain, eventually causing the urge to urinate.
  3. When the person is ready to urinate, the brain sends signals to the muscles around the pelvic floor and urethra to allow the urine to be released.

When there is a malfunction in any steps of this process, issues such as urge incontinence can arise. The following issues are among the most common causes of urge incontinence:

  • Diabetes
  • Neurological dysfunction
  • Medication side effects
  • Bladder abnormalities or growths
  • Age-related cognitive function decline

Testing for Urge Incontinence

Your doctor can perform a variety of tests to determine which will help them get a better idea of what may be causing symptoms. The most common tests that are performed include:

  • Urine Volume Test. After urinating, the doctor will measure the amount of urine that is left inside of the bladder. This will help determine if leftover urine is causing symptoms that are nearly identical to an overactive bladder.
  • Urine Flow Measurement. The doctor will measure the volume of urine and the speed at which the urine is leaving the urethra. This test will help them identify any possible issues caused by blockages or abnormalities. 
  • Bladder Pressure Test. The doctor will slowly fill the bladder with warm water. A pressure sensor will be used to measure changes in the patient’s bladder pressure. This will help identify any involuntary muscle contractions or a bladder that is not able to store urine at low pressure.

Urge Incontinence Treatment Options

The first two steps in the treatment process include behavior modifications such as pelvic exercises or changes in diet, and medications that can help reduce the urge to go. But, when those options fail to relieve symptoms, other treatments may be necessary.

InterStim Percutaneous Urinary Nerve Stimulation Therapy.

InterStim therapy is a proven neuromodulation therapy that targets the communication problem between the brain and the nerves that control the bladder. If those nerves are not communicating correctly, the bladder will not function properly. The InterStim system uses an external device during a trial assessment period and an internal device for long-term therapy.

The trial InterStim device can be inserted by our physicians at a regular office visit. In the procedure, the physician will numb a small area and insert a thin, flexible wire near your tailbone. The wire is taped to your skin and connected to a small external device which you’ll wear on your waistband. The external device sends mild electrical pulses through the wire to nerves near your tailbone which may get your bladder working the way it’s supposed to.

Nerve Stimulation

This option uses a small device that is implanted under the skin in order to control the electric pulses to the sacral nerves. The sacral nerves help transmit messages from the bladder to the brain. Before a permanent device is placed under the skin, a temporary device is clipped to the patient’s belt and used for a few weeks to determine if this is a viable treatment option.

Bladder Injections

Bladder injections are sometimes chosen to partially paralyze the muscles around the bladder. Typically these treatments are effective for approximately five months before another injection is needed. 

Surgery

Surgery is often a last resort for those with bladder issues. The goal of bladder surgery is to improve the bladder’s ability to more effectively retain urine and reduce the amount of unnecessary pressure felt before urinating. 

If you have any questions, or would like to schedule an appointment for urge incontinence evaluation and treatment, contact Comprehensive Women’s Care at (614) 583-5552.

COVID-19 Update

Due to the recent coronavirus outbreak, COVID-19, we are taking steps to protect our patients, employees and their loved ones. We can all play a role in slowing the speed at which the virus spreads.

As your healthcare provider, we are committed to your health and safety. Starting on March 16, we will be rescheduling all routine well visits/annuals appointments.

This DOES NOT include our pregnant patients or anyone who needs an urgent appointment.

This DOES include anyone with routine, follow up, and/or annual visits who do not have any abnormal issues. If you are elderly, immunocompromised, or have underlying medical conditions, please do not come into our office during this time.

Your health is important to us and we welcome you to call our office if you need any help deciding if you need to reschedule your appointment.

If you have a fever, cough, or shortness of breath, please do not come to the office for an appointment. Please instead call us to reschedule.

We have always been very welcoming of additional support people and children in our office, but at this time, we are asking that you do not bring any guests to your visits. If you need assistance and a support person is necessary, please call our office so arrangements can be made.

This is only temporary for the safety and well being of ALL our patients at CWC.

The situation is fluid, and we are continually reassessing it.

We will be offering telemedicine appointments beginning March 23rd.

We will be updating you regularly, and we welcome you to call our office to speak to our staff with any questions or concerns.

Comprehensive Women's Care